Keynote Speakers

Prof.Dr. Tetsuo Sawaragi

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.
Tel : +81-75-383-3581
E-mail:: sawaragi@me.kyoto-u.ac.jp

A short CV:

       Tetsuo Sawaragi is a professor in the Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Science at Kyoto University’s Graduate School of Engineering. Sawaragi received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Systems Engineering from Kyoto University in 1981, 1983, and 1988, respectively. From 1991 to 1992, he was a visiting scholar in the Dept. of Engineering-Economic Systems of Stanford University, USA. He has been engaged in research on Systems Engineering, Cognitive Science, and Artificial Intelligence, particularly in the development of human-machine collaborative systems. He is in the position of the immediate past president of SICE (the Society of Instrument and Control Engineers). He has served as the president of the Society of Instrument and Control Engineers (SICE), a chair of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society (IEEE SMC) Japan Chapter, the president of the Human Interface Society, and the president of the Institute of Systems, Control and Information Engineers (ISCIE). He is currently a vice-chair of the Technical Committee on Human-Machine Systems of the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC). The topics he is now engaged in are as follows;
- Semiotic analysis and design of safe and reliable human-automation systems
- Ecological interface design for teaching assembly operations to an industrial robot
- Semiotic analysis of human bodily motions

Title:
Establishing Resilient Harmony for Super-Smart Society by Human-System Co-Creation

Abstract:

       The realization of the 'super-smart society' of "Society 5.0" is being promulgated as the 5th Science and Technology Basic Plan by the Japanese Government. This talk summarizes what is needed to promote new science and technology for achieving a super-smart society. Especially to accelerate the development of "control for societal issues," three aspects of "Feedback," "Ring" and "Harmony," are to be stressed. That is, science and technology should target society or community, not single persons and individuals. Besides, we have to understand complex feedback structures made up of many interactions as an essential means to attain the goal of harmonizing technology, human, and the environment. For this purpose, innovations will necessitate elaborating the SoS (System of Systems), mutually connected systems, including human-in-the-loop systems. It would be significant to model and understand the dynamical complexity of such an SoS and to develop a technique for guaranteeing their resilience. This talk presents overviews of some of the author group's works that are related to the above three aspects.
Keywords: Society 5.0, super-smart society, SoS (System of Systems), human-in-the-loop system, resilience, learning health system, human skill modeling, cognitive task analysis, socio-technical systems.

Prof.Dr. Ng See-Kiong

Department of Computer Science of the School of Computing and the Deputy Director of the university’s Institute of Data Science, National University of Singapore (NUS), Singapore
E-mail:: seekiong@nus.edu.sg

A short CV:

       See-Kiong Ng (Ph.D. Carnegie Mellon University) is a Professor of Practice at the Department of Computer Science of the School of Computing at National University of Singapore (NUS), and the Deputy Director of the university’s Institute of Data Science. Prior to joining NUS in 2016, See-Kiong was a Programme Director of the Urban Systems Initiative by the Science and Engineering Research Council of the Agency of Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). The Initiative was a pioneering research program that developed technologies and innovations for smart cities to address the many new challenges of the rapidly urbanising world. See-Kiong’s research interest is to develop data-driven approaches to obtain better insights and understanding of the world through computation of data, and to create real-world impact through translating the research outcomes into real-life applications by collaborating with partners from the industry and public agencies. See-Kiong started his research career as one of the early bioinformaticians in the 1990s. He has since been applying what he had learned from bioinformatics to a wide array of other application domains, with more than 100 papers in leading peer-reviewed journals and conferences. A long-time practitioner of data science, See-Kiong has been unafraid to venture into new areas and he has been active in a wide array of research topics from text mining, social and biological network mining to trajectory data mining and privacy-preserving data mining.

Title:
Can AI Rescue us from COVID-19 and Future Pandemics?

Abstract:

       With the many high-profile recent successes of artificial intelligence (AI) in various domains, it is natural for us to expect AI to come to rescue us from COVID-19. As the world continues to combat the outbreak of coronavirus, many have indeed turned to AI for help. While AI has certainly become smart enough to beat us in many complex games, can it help us beat the pandemic? In this talk, we will take a look at the current efforts in tapping into AI technologies in the fight against the COVID-19 outbreak, and examine what it will take for AI to become our secret panacea against future pandemics.